Spiders


Spiders

Many species of spiders are common household pests in the United States. Spiders are considered a beneficial pest because of their prey to other insects and many people do not consider spider control measures for most spiders. Because spiders have eight legs, they are easy to separate from insects, which have only six legs. Another distinction between spiders and other pests is that spiders do not have wings or antennae. Spiders are arachnids.

Location of Spiders

Some Spiders populations are found in humid and moist locations like basements and crawl spaces. Other Spiders prefer dry and warm places. They can be found in upper corners of rooms and attics as well as sub floor air-vents. Spiders prefer to hide in dark areas and in cracks as a retreat in order to construct material for their webs.

Spider Webs (Cobwebs)

Some species place webs over lamps, in corners, attics and basements. Every “cobweb” was made by a spider.

Spider Bites and Venom

In order to kill their prey, all spiders use venom. Not all spiders however are dangerous to humans.

If Black Widow Spiders and Brown Recluse Spiders, Hobo Spiders and European House Spiders are found, pest control treatment should be considered. These spiders do not create spider webs indoors.

Although there is generally little danger resulting from spider bites from most spiders, it is advisable to consult a physician from spider bites.

BLACK WIDOW SPIDERS

The female has a shiny black, globular abdomen with two yellow or red markings in a triangle shape. It looks like an hourglass. Males are smaller, lighter in color, with light streaks on the abdomen. The web is irregular, many times found along exterior foundations on slabs, under stones and rocks, behind shrubs. They usually don’t enter structures. They will bite if provoked. The bite feels like a sharp pain, like a needle puncture. After 15 minutes to an hour there will be muscular cramps. Bites are rarely fatal, but you should seek medical attention.

 

Bedbugs – The life cycle stages of a bed bug are egg, nymph, and adult. The reason they are called bed bugs is that they readily infest mattresses, bed frames and box springs. Eggs are laid along the edges of or around buttons on the mattresses. Eggs can also be glued to rough surfaces. Bed bug females lay about 200 eggs, usually at the rate of three or four a day. Eggs are placed in cracks, crevices and other isolated and protected shelters. Females lay eggs after a blood meal. Eggs will hatch in one or two weeks into Nymphs. Newly hatched bugs (Nymphs) begin feeding immediately. At room temperature, and with an available food supply, the nymphal period will last 14 to 30 days. They shed their skin (Instar) five times before becoming adults. Bed bugs will mate soon after becoming mature, so the time from egg hatch to egg laying is 4 to 9 weeks, under favorable conditions. The average life span of the bed bug is 6-12 months and they feed every 10 days or so during this time. Bed bugs can survive many months without a blood meal and their reproduction is high.

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